Review: Havok – Conformicide Mar17

Review: Havok – Conformicide

Let me tell you how this review is suppose to go: First, I tell you that Havok is a Denver based collective whose main weapon of choice is the riff. I then explain how the band is one of the few that are still relevant today despite being unquestionably retro-thrash and proceed to point out that 2011’s Time Is Up is probably one of the strongest records to come out of said retro movement. I follow-up with a brief overview of their latest, entitled Conformicide, pointing out its various high points to underscore the fact that David Sanchez and Co. really do know how to throw down. Finally and disappointedly, I end with a Steely D...

Review: Metallica – Hardwired…To Self-Destruct Nov25

Review: Metallica – Hardwired…To Self-Destruct

A little context: I’m a big Metallica fan. I have been for over twenty years now. What’s funny is unlike most fans, I discovered Metallica through Megadeth in a sort of six degrees of Kevin Bacon moment; it took me three Megadeth records to finally arrive at Puppets. Sad but true. But the truth is I lost track of Metallica right after 1996’s Load, an album that completed their transition from being everyone’s favorite Bay Area thrash metal band to a full-fledged hard rock one, bifurcating their fanbase in the process. Since then these retired thrashers have fallen under hard times, with the band probably hitting rock...

Forgotten Legends: Morbid Saint – Spectrum of Death

Forgotten Legends is an ongoing series where we look back on those extraordinary yet often overlooked albums that are essential to any serious metal collection. They can be of any format, released at any time. As always, a dynamic range measurement is provided for reference. When I was growing up, my whole world revolved around Megadeth, Metallica, and to a lesser extent, Slayer. That’s it. They were the be all, end all of metal, and ignorance was as they say, bliss. However, as I grew older, my metal tastes slowly evolved and I started to take my metal more seriously. That’s one of the reasons why in fact I started to read a...

Forgotten Legends: Razor – Violent Restitution

Forgotten Legends is an ongoing series where we look back on those extraordinary yet often overlooked albums that are essential to any serious metal collection. They can be of any format, released at any time. As always, a dynamic range measurement is provided for reference. I think it’s safe to say now that 2016 has become a banner year for thrash. I mean we’ve already seen a number of thrastastic records from industry stalwarts Megadeth, Anthrax, and Death Angel to more nouveau acts like Vektor and Destroyer 666, and there is still a lot more yet to come with new releases looming from the likes of Revocation and of course that...

Vektor – Terminal Redux May23

Vektor – Terminal Redux

If you’ve been following the metal scene at all over the last few years then it’s hard not to be even peripherally aware of Vektor. Their story began back in 2009 with Black Future, which despite its Voivodian aesthetics was much more than an exercise in artful plagiarism – where Voivod’s underpinning is squarely in punk, Vektor’s sound moves past the prototypical progressive thrash metal formula by infusing it with elements of both black and death, resulting in a much more aggressive tone than their Canadian muse. Two years later, they reaffirmed their position as one of the most exciting bands in the thrash...

Black Future Vinyl Follow Up May13

Black Future Vinyl Follow Up

Five years after Outer Isolation, Arizona’s Vektor have finally returned with their latest, Terminal Redux. I imagine Alex will have something to say about this album and how good it is before too long (Oh I will. -Alex), but in the meantime, I thought it might be a good idea to go back to the beginning and take a look at the vinyl release of the band’s 2009 debut, Black Future. For those not already in the know, Vektor weaves some ‘80s thrash influences (particularly Voivod) together with more modern technical progressivism. Guitarist and vocalist David DiSanto’s blackened wails are coupled with interesting and fairly unique sonic...

Dystopia Vinyl Follow Up Feb22

Dystopia Vinyl Follow Up

According to Alex, Megadeth’s latest opus is a stunning return to form, their best since Youthanasia. In my humble opinion, it’s a solid effort, certainly far superior to the disaster that preceded it, but I think it’s only about equal in quality to The System Has Failed and United Abominations. For the record, I really liked UA, and hated Endgame, so take that for what you will. While I think the album overall is kind of everything Megadeth post 2000 thrown into a blender, and of course lyrically awful (Jingoism? Yeah, we got jingoism) I certainly have to respect the considerable talents of new lead guitarist Kiko Loureiro, who proves just...

Megadeth – Dystopia

Angry Metal-Fi is a series of articles that are cross posted on Angry Metal Guy and Metal-Fi as a collaborative effort to evangelize dynamics in metal. “What’s your favorite band?” A question that I’m sure all of you have been invariably asked at least once in your life. The fact is over my illustrious metal listening career, my tastes have evolved and become so varied that I don’t have just one “favorite band” anymore. To make matters worse, most of the time when I am asked this question, it’s typically posed by someone who isn’t exactly a metal cognoscenti. So even though I could...

Angelus Apatrida – Hidden Evolution Feb12

Angelus Apatrida – Hidden Evolution

Angelus Apatrida are a four piece unit out of Spain who first made a name for themselves back in 2007 with their Give’Em War release. Up until that point, Angelus could be concisely summarized as another ho-hum power metal act with a few flashes of thrashy greatness sprinkled in here and there. But with War, these “fallen angels” really brought the ruckus by supplanting most of their power riffs with this very aggressive, late 80s inspired Bay Area thrash core. Now whether this was the band jumping on the retro bandwagon or just artistic capriciousness I know not, but it certainly proved to be a smart business decision...